Download The Hispanic World and American Intellectual Life, 1820–1880 by Iván Jaksić (auth.) PDF

By Iván Jaksić (auth.)

This publication examines why a number of American literary and highbrow icons turned pioneering students of the Hispanic international after Independence and the conflict 1812. At this significant time for the younger republic, those proficient americans chanced on thought in an not likely position: the collapsing Spanish empire and used it to form their very own country's identity.

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The Hispanic World and American Intellectual Life, 1820–1880

This publication examines why a number of American literary and highbrow icons grew to become pioneering students of the Hispanic international after Independence and the struggle 1812. At this significant time for the younger republic, those talented americans chanced on suggestion in an not likely position: the collapsing Spanish empire and used it to form their very own country's identification.

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The dark shadow which it casts upon his brilliant renown will be a lesson to all rulers, teaching them what is important to their own fame in their treatment of illustrious men. (VII, 190) Thus, by the 1820s and early 1830s, Irving had successfully created a highly readable and popular venue to convey a lasting view of Spain and the Spanish character. Irving’s narrative, however charming at times, openly presented Spain as a country whose better days were now far behind. All that was left was a sad though picturesque legacy of ruins and widespread idleness.

George Ticknor to George S. Hillard, July 17, 1848 O n Tuesday afternoon, February 7, 1815, Thomas Jefferson bid farewell to the young George Ticknor, who had arrived at Monticello the previous Saturday from Boston to pay him a visit. S. president about Europe, where he intended to go in the spring, and in preparation for which he wanted some letters of introduction. Jefferson was very impressed with the young man. He showed him his collection of antiquities, his gallery of paintings, and most importantly, his 7,000volume library.

Jefferson was very impressed with the young man. He showed him his collection of antiquities, his gallery of paintings, and most importantly, his 7,000volume library. The 24-year-old visitor was so poised and intelligent in conversation that he left a most favorable and lasting impression, which Jefferson conveyed to several correspondents. ”2 Something in the young man’s comportment made him optimistic about the future of American letters. George Ticknor had chosen a life of scholarship, and he intended to pursue advanced studies in classical literature at the University of Göttingen.

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