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By Mark Feldstein

From Publishers Weekly Feldstein, an award-winning journalist and professor on the college of Maryland, chronicles the debatable careers of 2 iconic figures, former president Richard Nixon and the investigative suggested he feared most--Jack Anderson. With the astute research of a psychotherapist, Feldstein exhibits how the emotional and spiritual strengths, or flaws, of Nixon, the over-ambitious Quaker baby-kisser, and Anderson, the pious Mormon scribe, play out in a three-decade-long online game to win over American public opinion. even if Nixon was once engineering a gay smear via wiretaps and doctored pictures or the muckraking columnist used to be probing the Republican's hidden slush money and diverse scandals, the publication chronicles a slew of wrongdoings important of a sleazy pulp bestseller. Neither guy escapes unscathed: Nixon, the schizoid schemer, or Anderson, the self-righteous campaigner. Brutal, fantastic, and gripping, this darkish parable of tainted Beltway politics and an overreaching media lays the basis for the present cultural stench of famous person exposes and bed-hopping lawmakers. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved. From Booklist For 1 / 4 of a century, flesh presser Richard Nixon and columnist Jack Anderson engaged in a sour conflict royal, each one sometimes utilizing blackmail, bribery, spying, and housebreaking to attempt and defeat the opposite. Media pupil and previous reporter Feldstein bargains a deliciously targeted account of the backstory, fierce enmity, and legacy of scandalmongering and toxic clash among the media and political figures. regardless of their related backgrounds—both grew up in working-class households steeped in faith (Nixon a Quaker, Anderson a Mormon)—they nurtured profession goals, with out compunction approximately ethical ambiguity, that at last led them to Washington. whereas Nixon climbed throughout the ranks of the Republican social gathering until eventually he reached the presidency, Anderson handed his mentor, Drew Pearson, to make his “Merry-Go-Round” column a strong strength for destroying political careers. the 2 battled in the course of the Vietnam warfare and the Watergate scandal, with Anderson riffling via rubbish and bugging conversations to rfile each Nixon misstep, triggering Nixon’s retaliation with wiretaps, smears, or even a plot to kill Anderson. Feldstein gives you an interesting chronicle of the poisoned courting among strong males and its lasting impression on political journalism. --Vanessa Bush

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Poisoning the Press: Richard Nixon, Jack Anderson, and the Rise of Washington's Scandal Culture

From Publishers Weekly Feldstein, an award-winning journalist and professor on the collage of Maryland, chronicles the debatable careers of 2 iconic figures, former president Richard Nixon and the investigative suggested he feared most--Jack Anderson. With the astute research of a psychotherapist, Feldstein exhibits how the emotional and non secular strengths, or flaws, of Nixon, the over-ambitious Quaker flesh presser, and Anderson, the pious Mormon scribe, play out in a three-decade-long video game to win over American public opinion.

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Extra resources for Poisoning the Press: Richard Nixon, Jack Anderson, and the Rise of Washington's Scandal Culture

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In one sense, the White House plot to poison a newsman was unprecedented. Certainly no other president in American history had ever been suspected of ordering a Mafia-style hit to silence a journalistic critic. Yet it was also an extreme and literal example of a larger conspiracy to contaminate the rest of the media as well, a metaphor for what would become a generation of toxic conflict between the press and the politicians they covered. It was not just that Nixon’s administration wiretapped journalists, put them on enemies lists, audited their tax returns, censored their newspapers, and moved to revoke their broadcasting licenses.

After all, the Hay-Adams was once one of Washington’s most venerable old mansions, adorned with plush leather chairs, rich walnut paneling, and ornate oil paintings, located on Lafayette Square directly across the street from the White House. But on a chilly afternoon in March 1972, in one of the most bizarre and overlooked chapters of American political history, the luxury hotel did indeed serve as a launching pad for a murder conspiracy. More surprising still was the target of this assassination scheme, syndicated columnist Jack Anderson, then the most famous investigative reporter in the United States, whose exposés had plagued President Richard Nixon since he had first entered politics more than two decades earlier.

In Jefferson’s time, most publications were funded not by advertising, as they are today, but by political parties, which used the press as a weapon of propaganda. In the nation’s capital, favored printers received lucrative federal contracts to transcribe congressional debates, making Washington journalism an unsavory blend of stenography and partisanship that has persisted to the present. Still, as media outlets evolved from party organs to profit-making businesses, the most vicious forms of journalistic invective began to fade away.

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